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Minnesota State University, Mankato
Minnesota State University, Mankato

Biochemistry Course Description

Page address: http://cset.mnsu.edu/chemgeol/programs/chem/biochem-course-description.html

Course Descriptions

CHEM 100 (4) Chemistry in Society
This lecture and laboratory course investigates the world of chemistry, the nature of matter and our interactions with chemicals on a daily basis. This course is intended for non-science majors and is not a preparation for CHEM 111 or 201.
Fall, Spring
GE-3

CHEM 104 (3) Introduction to Chemistry
This course is an introduction to general chemistry. It is a non-laboratory class designed to prepare students for Chemistry 201 or to be utilized as a general education course. This course will address more mathematical relationships than Chemistry 106.
GE-3

CHEM 106 (3) Introduction to Chemistry (for Allied Health)
This course is an introduction to general and organic chemistry. This is a non-laboratory class designed to prepare students for Chemistry 111 or to be utilized as a general education course.
GE-3

CHEM 111 (5) Chemistry of Life Processes
This course is an introduction to organic chemistry and biological chemistry for students in nursing, dental hygiene, dietetics, and athletic training. The laboratory will reinforce lecture concepts.
Pre: CHEM 106 or High School Chemistry
Fall, Spring
GE-2, 3

CHEM 131 (3) Forensic Science
This chemistry course explores the scientific basis of crime-fighting using physical evidence. Course topics will include discussions of different kinds of evidence, how evidence must be preserved in order to be of value, how to select and analyze samples, and especially how to interpret results of scientific tests. Case studies will be used as examples throughout the course. There will also be discussions of ethical questions about the collection, analysis, and uses of forensic data.
Variable
GE-3, 9

CHEM 132 (3) Chemistry of Energy
This course explores and evaluates energy sources from a chemical perspective. In addition to discussion of chemical processes associated with traditional energy sources such as fossil fuels, alternative sources such as solar energy and "next generation" batteries will be presented. In conjunction with this information the environmental and societal consequences for each alternative will be explored.
Variable
GE-3

CHEM 133 (3) Challenges to Our Global Environment
This course will examine two of the most significant environmental challenges facing modern society: stratospheric ozone depletion and global climate change, from an interdisciplinary perspective. The course will start by examining, with a minimum of mathematics, the scientific basis and evidence for these phenomena, and then go on to consider the potential implications of and solutions to these challenges. In order to understand these potential implications and solutions, we must realize and understand the interdisciplinary nature of these challenges.
Variable
GE-2, 10

CHEM 134 (3) Mind Altering Substances
This course will explore the scientific, pharmacological, neurochemical and cultural aspects of psychoactive substances. The material is presented intuitively, with no mathematics. Course topics will include discussions of the major classes of pharmaceutical and psychoactive substances, basic neurochemistry, the role of psychoactive substances in medicine, the ritual use of psychoactive substances by traditional cultures, the FDA approval process, the significance and implications of drug testing, the controversy of drug-induced behavioral modification, national and global perspectives of substance abuse and the ethics of legalization.
Variable
GE-3

CHEM 191 (3) Chemistry for Engineers
This course covers basic chemistry and applications relevant to students interested in the engineering fields.
Pre: Placement into MATH 115 or MATH 121, high school chemistry or "C" or higher in CHEM 104
Fall, Spring
GE-2, GE-3

CHEM 201 (5) General Chemistry I
Introduction to the basic principles of chemistry including atomic and molecular structure, bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, thermodynamics and states of matter. Laboratory will reinforce lecture concepts.
Pre: "C" or better in MATH 112 or equivalent; high school Chemistry or CHEM 104.
Fall, Spring
GE-2, 3

CHEM 202 (5) General Chemistry II
Continuation of the basic principles of chemistry including properties of solutions, kinetics, acids and bases, equilibria, buffers, precipitation reactions, electron transfer reactions, electrochemistry, entropy and free energy. Laboratory will reinforce lecture concepts.
Pre: "C" or better in CHEM 201
Fall, Spring

CHEM 299 (1-6) Individual Study

CHEM 305 (4) Analytical Chemistry
Introduction to the principles of chemical analysis, with emphasis on classical methods of analysis. Lectures will stress the theory of chemical measurements and sample handling. Laboratory exercises will provide students with opportunities to explore calibration methods, method development, and established procedures for volumetric and gravimetric analyses. Basic atomic spectroscopy is also presented.
Pre: "C" or better in CHEM 202
Fall, Spring

CHEM 312 (2) Intermediate Inorganic Chemistry
This course is designed to emphasize the descriptive aspects of inorganic chemistry. Course topics include nuclear chemistry, reactivity patterns of selected s and
p block elements and a brief introduction to coordination chemistry.
Pre: "C" or better in CHEM 202
Spring

CHEM 320 (5) Organic Chemistry I
Introduction to organic structure, bonding, chemical reactivity, reactions as acids and bases, mechanisms and stereochemistry. The chemistry of alkanes, alkyl halides, alkenes, alkynes, alcohols, ethers, aldehydes and ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives, and amines will be covered. Laboratory illustrates synthetic techniques and the preparation and reactions of functional groups discussed during lecture.
Pre: CHEM 202
Fall

CHEM 321 (3) Organic Chemistry II
The chemistry of aromatic compounds, free radicals, polyenes, macromolecules, heterocyclic compounds, carbohydrates, amino acids, peptides, and proteins will be covered. This will include a study of mechanisms, synthetic transformations, concerted reactions, and spectroscopy.
Pre: "C" or better in CHEM 320
Spring

CHEM 331 (1) Organic Chemistry II Lab
Laboratory illustrating electrophilic aromatic substitutions and other reactions of aromatic compounds, synthetic transformations as well as qualitative organic analysis.
Pre: CHEM 321 previously or concurrently
Spring

CHEM 360 (4) Principles of Biochemistry
Analysis of the structure and metabolism of biologically important compounds. This intermediate-level course is designed for students in the medical technology, food science, chemistry education, chemistry and pre-professional health majors. The laboratory teaches basic biochemical techniques.
Pre: "C" or better in CHEM 320
Spring

CHEM 381 (2) Introduction to Research
Introduction to the use of chemical literature (in print and electronic media), current departmental faculty research interests, safe and ethical conduct of laboratory research, and proper recording of research results in laboratory notebooks. Students perform a literature search and write a proposal for an undergraduate research project.
Pre: CHEM 321
Fall

CHEM 407 (3) Environmental Chemistry
A broad introduction to the chemistry of natural waters and chemical analysis of such systems. Topics covered may include: macromolecular analytes, organic analytes, inorganic analytes, major component/minor component/trace component determinations, matrix effects, equilibrium processes, modeling of chemical/physical transport, regulatory monitoring, and compliance issues. Laboratory exercises will provide students with goal-oriented, cooperative experiences in sampling and measurement of complex samples.
Pre: "C" or better in CHEM 305
Variable

CHEM 413 (3) Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
A survey of topics in inorganic chemistry including quantum mechanics, symmetry and group theory, solid state chemistry, molecular structure and geometry, bonding theories, and coordination chemistry, emphasizing the theoretical foundation.
Pre: "C" or better in CHEM 441
Fall

CHEM 415 (2) Inorganic Preparations
The preparation and study of inorganic/organometallic compounds utilizing a variety of synthetic techniques including common Schlenk techniques. The studies will include characterization by common instrumental methods such as IR, NMR and UV-vis spectroscopy. Additional studies using instrumental techniques such as IR, NMR, UV-vis, electrochemistry and magnetic susceptibility will also be conducted.
Pre: "C" or better in CHEM 413
Spring

CHEM 423 (4) Chemical and Spectroscopic Determination of Structure
Spectroscopic techniques including nuclear magnetic resonance, infrared, and mass spectrometry for determining structural features of molecules will be covered. Spectroscopic methods emphasize interpretation of spectra, and also provide hands-on operation of the corresponding electronic instruments. The laboratory uses these techniques for the determination of the structures of a series of unknown compounds.
Pre: CHEM 321 and 331
Spring

CHEM 424 (3) Advanced Organic Chemistry
Advanced synthetic organic reactions and their mechanisms. Laboratory will include examples of some of this chemistry, and techniques for reaction monitoring and product purification.
Pre: "C" or better in CHEM 421
Spring-EVEN

CHEM 434 (2) Industrial Chemistry
The synthesis and properties of organic macromolecules, especially industrially important polymers, and the chemistry of other industrially important chemical reactions and processes.
Pre: CHEM 321
Spring-ODD

CHEM 437 (4) Food Chemistry
This lecture laboratory course will cover the fundamental principles of food chemistry. Chemical and physical properties of major and minor food components will be discussed. The laboratory will involve both traditional wet chemical methods and more sophisticated instrumental analyses.
Pre: "C" or better in CHEM 305, CHEM 320; Pre or Co: CHEM 360 or 460

CHEM 440 (3) Physical Chemistry I
Detailed treatment of thermodynamics and chemical kinetics. Topics include equations of state, laws of thermodynamics, statistical thermodynamics, phase and reaction equilibrium, thermodynamics of solutions and electrochemistry, transport properties, and reaction kinetics.
Pre: "C" or better in CHEM 305, "C" or better in MATH 121, "C" or better in PHYS 212 or PHYS 221
Fall

CHEM 441 (3) Physical Chemistry II
Detailed treatment of quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, and statistical mechanics. Topics include the foundations of quantum mechanics, application of quantum mechanics to atomic and molecular structure, foundations of spectroscopic techniques and statistical mechanics.
Pre: "C" or better in CHEM 440, "C" or better in MATH 122, "C' or better in PHYS 222
Spring

CHEM 445 (2) Advanced Physical Chemistry
Integrated application of the content from 440 and 441 to an applied topic of interest to the instructor. The course will depend heavily on reading and discussion of current primary literature of physical chemistry. Possible topics include: atmospheric chemistry, thermodynamics of protein folding, catalytic processes, or molecular processes at interfaces.
Pre: "C" or better in CHEM 441
Variable

CHEM 450 (1) Physical Chemistry Laboratory I
Laboratory to accompany 440. An advanced treatment of measurement theory and data analysis precedes a series of thermodynamic and kinetic experiments designed to complement topics treated in lecture to help students' independence and sophistication in planning, performing, and reporting experimental work.
Pre: CHEM 440 previously or concurrently
Fall

CHEM 451 (1) Physical Chemistry Laboratory II
Laboratory to accompany 441. Experiments and computational projects in quantum mechanics, spectroscopy, and statistical mechanics. The experiments and projects will continue to work toward the goal of increasing the students' independence and sophistication.
Pre: "C" or better in CHEM 440; Pre or Co: CHEM 441
Spring

CHEM 460 (3) Biochemistry I
Detailed analysis of the structures, properties, and functions of proteins, carbohydrates, and lipids; introduction to carbohydrate metabolism; theory for the purification and analysis of proteins. Concurrent enrollment in CHEM 465 is recommended.
Pre: "C" or better in CHEM 320, and BIOL 106
Fall

CHEM 461 (3) Biochemistry II
Detailed analysis of the reactions involved in intermediary metabolism, translation, transcription, and replication.
Pre: CHEM 460
Spring

CHEM 465 (1) Biochemical Techniques I
A lecture/laboratory course which presents methodology and instrumentation used to purify and analyze biomolecules. Techniques include chromatography, autoradiography and radioisotope techniques, polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, and spectrophotometry.
Pre or Co: CHEM 460; CHEM 305 is recommended.
Fall

CHEM 466 (2) Biochemical Techniques II
Students work in teams to solve biochemical research problems by analyzing data from experiments which they design.
Pre: CHEM 460 and CHEM 465
Spring

CHEM 474 (2) Chromatography
Theory and applications of thin layer, paper, liquid, gas and supercritical fluid chromatography and capillary electrospheresis.
Pre or Co: CHEM 320
Fall-EVEN

CHEM 475 (4) Instrumental Analysis
Theory and practice of modern instrumental methods including basic electronics. Special emphasis placed on sampling methods, analog and digital electronics, electrochemistry, spectrophotometric and chromatographic methods, surface and thin-film analysis and computer acquisition and data processing techniques.
Pre: "C" or better in CHEM 305; PHYS 212 or 222 is recommended
Spring

CHEM 477 (1-3) Special Topics in Instrumental Analytical Chemistry
Detailed study and focused discussion of a specific analytical technique such as electrochemistry, X-ray analysis, etc. or an area of analysis such as metals, bioanalytical, etc. May be taken more than once for credit.
Pre: CHEM 305
Variable

CHEM 479 (4) Teaching Physical Science
Methods and materials for teaching physical sciences in middle school through high school. Clinical experiences required for the course.
Pre: Consent
Spring

CHEM 482 (1-3) Problems in Teaching Science
Variable

CHEM 485 (1-2) Seminar in Environmental Chemistry
Study of current environmental problems or issues with emphasis on the relevant chemical needs and understanding necessary to monitoring or alleviating the problems.
Pre: CHEM 305
Variable

CHEM 490 (1-6) Workshop

CHEM 495 (1) Senior Seminar
Capstone course for majors in Chemistry, Biochemistry and Chemistry Teaching. During this course students will present the results of their research in several different forums including oral presentations and poster sessions.
Pre: Consent
Spring

CHEM 496 (1-6) Senior Thesis

CHEM 497 (1-16) Internship

CHEM 498 (1-6) Undergraduate Research

CHEM 499 (1-6) Individual Study