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Minnesota State University, Mankato
Minnesota State University, Mankato

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Graduates

Page address: http://cset.mnsu.edu/mathstat/program/grad.html

Commutative Diagram

 

Department of
Mathematics and Statistics
Graduate Programs

 

The Department of Mathematics and Statistics offers four programs leading to a Master's degree. The Master of Arts (MA) program enables students to study pure mathematics, mathematics for teaching in community colleges or mathematics with a selection of courses in computer science. The Master of Science (MS) programs enable students to specialize in secondary teaching or mathematics with statistics. Each program requires a total of 34 semester credits at least half of which must be 600-level and a Master's Thesis or an Alternate Plan Paper, plus an oral defense of the thesis or paper. Our graduate programs are small allowing one-on-one interaction between faculty and students. Graduate assistantships are available in the department every year. Graduates of our programs have found employment in a variety of fields, including software engineering, graphic design, insurance, actuarial science, community college teaching, secondary education and statistics. Other students have gone forward in their education to obtain a Ph. D. in mathematics or statistics.


 

Master of Arts in Mathematics

The program with a broad selection emphasis requires a comprehensive examination over the core courses Real Analysis (Math 517), Linear Algebra (Math 547), Numerical Analysis (Math 570) and Theory of Statistics (Math 555). Two of these courses may be selected to count for the degree. The other two courses shall be treated as deficiencies if they are not part of the student's background. The remainder of the student's courses should include Real Analysis (Math 518, 611), Graphs and Algorithms (Math 605), Applied Mathematics (Math 620), Abstract Algebra (Math 641), Topology (Math 692), Linear Models (Stat 653), and either Numerical Analysis of Differential Equations (Math 672) or Computational Linear Algebra (Math 674).

The program with a community college teaching emphasis requires a comprehensive examination over the core courses Real Analysis (Math 517), Linear Algebra (Math 547), Numerical Analysis (Math 570) and Theory of Statistics (Math 555). Two of these courses may be selected to count for the degree. The other two courses shall be treated as deficiencies if they are not part of the student's background. The remainder of the student's courses should include Real Analysis (Math 518, 611), Applied Mathematics (Math 620), Abstract Algebra (Math 641), Topology (Math 692), and Linear Models (Stat 653). Students interested in teaching in a community college should also talk with their advisors about methods courses to strengthen their ability to teach. Licensure is not required to teach in a community college, but courses in teaching skills are recommended.

The program with a mathematics and computer science emphasis requires a comprehensive examination over the core courses Real Analysis (Math 517), Linear Algebra (Math 547), Numerical Analysis (Math 570) and Theory of Statistics (Math 555). Two of these courses may be selected to count for the degree. The other two courses shall be treated as deficiencies if they are not part of the student's background. The remainder of the student's courses should include Graphs and Algorithms (Math 605), Applied Mathematics (Math 620), either Numerical Analysis of Differential Equations (Math 672) or Computational Linear Algebra (Math 674), Computer Organization (CS 520), Operating Systems (CS 560), Algorithm Analysis (CS 610) and Theory of Computation (CS 611). More information can be found in the official Graduate Bulletin.


 

Master of Science in Mathematics Education

Teaching licensure is a prerequisite to pursuing this degree. This program does not lead to initial teaching licensure. Students who desire initial licensure should consider the Master of Arts in Teaching (MAT) degree offered through the College of Education.

This program requires Real Analysis (Math 517), Abstract Algebra (Math 641), Mathematical Problem Solving and Modeling for Teachers (Math 661), Algebraic Structures in School Mathematics (Math 662), Geometric Structures in School Mathematics (Math 663) and Research in Mathematics Education (Math 690). A comprehensive examimation on these topics is required. Also required, with the approval of the student's advisor, are six credits of professional education courses and seven to nine credits of electives. More information can be found in the official Graduate Bulletin.


 

Master of Science in Mathematics and Statistics

This program requires the core courses Real Analysis (Math 517), Linear Algebra (Math 547), Numerical Analysis (Math 570) and Theory of Statistics I (Math 555). Two of these courses may be selected to count for the degree. The other two courses shall be treated as deficiencies if they are not part of the student's background. It also requires a comprehensive examination over four courses chosen with advisor approval.  Three courses are to be chosen from Real Analysis I (Math 517),  Linear Algebra II (Math 547), Numerical Analysis I (Math 570), Theory of Statistics I (Math 555), and one course is to be chosen from Theory of Statistics II (Stat 556), Regression (Stat 550) and Experimental Designs (Stat 551).  The remainder of the student's courses should include Regression Analysis (Stat 550), Experimental Designs (Stat 551), Theory of Statistics II (Stat 556), Linear Models (Stat 653), Topics in Statistics (Stat 680), Statistical Computing (Stat 696) and either Numerical Analysis of Differential Equations (Math 672) or Computational Linear Algebra (Math 674). More information can be found in the official Graduate Bulletin.

Master of Science in Applied Statistics

This program requires the core courses Regression Analysis (Stat 550), Theory of Statistics I (Stat 555), and Theorey of Statistics II (Stat 556), six to eighteen credits of restricted electives chosen from Experimental Designs (Stat 551), Sample Survey, Design and Analysis (Stat 557), Catagorical Data Analysis (Stat 558), Nonparametric Methods (Stat 559), Linear Models (Stat 653), Statistical Methods in Biostatistics and Survival Analysis (Stat 654), and three to 6 credits of Applied Mathematics chosen from Applied Mathematics (Math 620) and Numerical Optimization (Math 628).  A comprehensive exam is required over 4 courses chosen with advisor approval from Stat 555, Stat 556, Stat 550, Stat 551, Math 517, Math 547, and Math 570.  More information can be found in the official Graduate Bulletin.