Catalog Year

2022-2023

Degree

Bachelor of Science

Credits

120

Agricultural Sciences (BS)

Agricultural Sciences includes the study of soil management, and crop and animal production; the science is a combination of ecology, biology, chemistry, and genetics, and seeks to understand plant and animal nutrition and crop and animal production. Students prepare for careers related to agriculture as they learn soil physical and chemical characteristics and effects of agriculture on soil fertility. They study other factors of production including climate, weeds, fungi, erosion, leaching, and pests. Students also learn about plant physiology, genetics, nutrition, effects on soil, satellite-based micro-management of inputs and the maximization of sustained yield, and how to market farm products. 

Program Requirements

Required General Education

Study of biological processes at the suborganismal level including cell chemistry, metabolism, reproduction, genetics, and complex tissue physiology. Laboratory and discussion sessions stress problem solving and experimental design.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-03

Introduction to the basic principles of chemistry including atomic and molecular structure, bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, thermodynamics and states of matter. Laboratory will reinforce lecture concepts. Prereq: C or higher in MATH 112 or the equivalent; high school chemistry or C or higher in CHEM 104

Prerequisites: “C” (2.0) or higher in MATH 112 or the equivalent; high school chemistry or “C” (2.0) or higher in CHEM 104.

Goal Areas: GE-02, GE-03

Introduction to learning the written and oral communication of technical information. Assignments include writing and presenting proposals, reports, and documentation. Emphasis on use of rhetorical analysis, computer applications, collaborative writing, and usability testing to complete technical communication tasks in the workplace.

Prerequisites: ENG 101 

Goal Areas: GE-02, GE-13

Math Requirement - Choose 3 - 4 Credit(s).

Basic concepts of trigonometry as preparation for college level mathematics and science course work. Topics include concepts of algebra (real numbers, functions, graphs of functions, exponential and logarithmic functions), trigonometric functions, analytic trigonometry, applications of trigonometry, and analytic geometry.

Prerequisites: Satisfy Placement Table in this section, or MATH 112 with “C” (2.0) or better. 

Goal Areas: GE-04

This course will cover topics of precalculus mathematics. Topics covered will include functions, graphs of functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, conic sections, systems of equations and inequalities, matrices, trigonometric functions, circular functions, vectors and complex numbers, induction, series and probability.

Prerequisites: Satisfy Math Placement Table in this section, or grade of P in MATH 098.

Goal Areas: GE-04

Limits, continuity, the derivative and applications, transcendental functions, L'Hopital's Rule, and development of the Riemann integral.

Prerequisites: Satisfy Placement Table in this section, MATH 115 or both MATH 112 and MATH 113 with “C” (2.0) or better.

Goal Areas: GE-04

Major Common Core

Study of biological processes at the organismal level including a survey of life forms (viruses, bacteria, protists, fungi, plants, and animals), their evolution, and ecology. Laboratory and discussion sessions stress problem solving and experimental design.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105 

Introduction to genetic analysis. Topics covered will include those of both classical and modern genetics: population genetics, molecular genetics, genetic manipulation of organisms and selection. Central to this course will be the primacy of the trait as the object of genetics and the development/refinement of the concept of the gene. Lab included.Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, and MATH 112 

Principles of the study of relationships between organisms and the environment. Topics include flow of energy and materials, organism-level interactions, growth and evolution of populations, and community ecology. Field trips to prairie, lake, stream, and forest communities, training in data collection and analysis, use of equipment, and report writing. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105 and BIOL 106 or consent 

An introduction to the general principles and methods used in the study of microorganisms. Lab included. Prereq: One BIOL course and one semester of chemistry from among CHEM 104, CHEM 106, CHEM 111, or CHEM 201. Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: One BIOL course and one semester of chemistry from among CHEM 104, CHEM 106, CHEM 111, or CHEM 201 

Goal Areas: GE-03

This class examines the effects of natural and human-induced changes in climate on terrestrial and marine ecosystems. The course focuses on the science behind global change issues that have biological, social, and economic implicatons.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 215 or consent 

Continuation of the basic principles of chemistry including properties of solutions, kinetics, acids and bases, equilibria, buffers, precipitation reactions, electron transfer reactions, electrochemistry, entropy and free energy. Laboratory will reinforce lecture concepts.

Prerequisites: “C” (2.0) or higher in CHEM 201 

This is a lecture course introducing students to major federal environmental laws and regulations. Discussions include the cause(s) that prompted the enactment of various environmental legislation as well as intent and implementation of the legislation. Both Federal and State of MN environmental statutes will be discussed.

Prerequisites: none

Introduction to statistical analysis as applied to the health sciences. Examines concepts and methods of statistical procedures applied to health problems and issues.

Prerequisites: MATH 110, STAT 154, Or any other mathematics course higher than MATH 110.

This course examines basic business concepts and principles and their application to modern and future agriculture industries. Agribusiness topics covered include commodities, supply chain, finance, sales, accounting, law, engineering, food safety, healthcare, data analysis, and technology. Professionals in the agriculture industry will be brought into class to explain how business knowledge and skills are essential to various sectors; including but not limited to: livestock, poultry, corn/soybeans, bio-fuels, engineering, and natural resources. Students will have an opportunity to broaden their thinking, understanding, and professional potential as related to the agriculture industry while interacting with industry professionals.

Prerequisites: none

Major Restricted Electives

Required - Choose 1 Credit(s).

Experience in applied biology according to a prearranged training program for a minimum of five 40-hour weeks.

Prerequisites: Consent 

Individual Study

Prerequisites: none

Recommended - Choose 0 - 4 Credit(s).

Introduction to organic nomenclature, structure, bonding, chemical reactivity, organic acid-base reactions, mechanisms and stereochemistry. IR, MS, and NMR spectroscopy will be introduced. The chemistry of alkanes, alkyl halides, alkenes, alkynes, and alcohols will be covered. Laboratory illustrates synthetic techniques and the preparation and reactions of functional groups discussed during lecture.

Prerequisites: CHEM 202, “C” (2.0) or higher in CHEM 202.

Major Unrestricted Electives

Choose 18 - 20 Credit(s).

Biology of plants including unique features of plant cells, life histories, metabolism, anatomy, physiology, and ecology. The course empathizes plants' remarkable adaptations to their environments, their diversity, and the vital roles they play in ecological interactions. For biology and environmental science majors and minors. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105 and BIOL 106 or consent 

This course will provide a general introduction to physiological processes associated with nutrition, chemical composition of feedstuffs, nutritive requirements of domestic/production animals, and an introduction to formulating and balancing rations for relevant livestock species. Recommended Course: BIOL 105

Prerequisites: none

Soil ecology will focus on the genesis and classification of soils, the physical properties of soil as they relate to habitat formation, niches, interactions that exist among soil organisms, human impact on soil systems relative to population pressures and management practices. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 215, or consent 

This course will explore the structure and function of the vertebrate body in its diverse forms from fishes to mammals. Discussion of individual organ systems will focus on developmental patterns, function and evolutionary relationships. The lab will include microanatomy (histology) and macroanatomy (gross anatomy) of example organisms. Students will become familiar with the tissue, organ and system levels of the anatomy of vertebrates.

Prerequisites: none

A comparison of adaptation mechanisms, from cell to organ-system, used by animals in response to changes in environmental conditions such as oxygen, carbon dioxide, food availability, temperature, water, solutes, pressure and buoyancy.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106 or consent 

The course covers the reproductive physiology and management of domestic farm animals including cattle, sheep, horses, swine, turkeys, chickens. The reproductive cycles of females, and the control of reproduction in the male will be discussed, along with gestation, parturition, and offspring care. Common problems with reproduction, including infectious and environmental, will be presented, followed by appropriate management techniques. Laboratory included. BIOL 105 or equivalent recommended.

Prerequisites: none

This course will explore diseases of farm animals, along with treatment and prevention. Management, nutrition, and environment will be integrated with infectious and non-infectious disease incidence. Treatment options, preventative measures, and economic impacts of disease will be discussed. The process of a reporting a disease will be outlined, along with quarantine procedures. BIOL 105 or equivalent is recommended.

Prerequisites: none

Plant functions such as water relations, mineral nutrition, translocation, metabolisms, photosynthesis, photorespiration, fat and protein metabolism, respiration, growth and development, phytohormones, reproduction and environmental physiology. Lab included. (One semester organic chemistry is recommended.)

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 217, one semester organic chemistry recommended. 

Role of microorganisms in soil, air, water, sewage processes as well as methods of measurement and detection. Special emphasis on the role of microorganisms in bioremediation. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, and BIOL 270 

This course examines basic concepts and components of soils, factors that influence formation and degradation, soil as a natural resource for ecosystems and societies, and the importance of soil conservation to restore functions that reduce erosion, improve water quality and quantity, mitigate climate change, enhance biodiversity, and increase agricultural productivity to feed an expanding population. Students will gain hands-on experience in field and laboratory settings to assess soil quality and quantity, investigate site-specific and landscape-scale impacts to soils, and develop management strategies to protect and improve soils in urban and agricultural systems.

Prerequisites: none

An introduction to the multidisciplinary field of soil science and fertility. The course will examine the basic physical, chemical, and biological properties of soils. Further topics will explore soil genesis, soil health and management, and their relationships to crop production. Field trips and lab activities will be used to explore key concepts, with emphasis on examples relevant to the soils of southern Minnesota. Local field trips included.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-03

Choose 15 - 16 Credit(s).

A field course in the ecology of birds, mammals, amphibians, reptiles, and fishes. Students are trained in sampling techniques such as mark-and-recapture, population size estimation and monitoring, and species identification of live and preserved specimens. Lectures encompass evolution and adoption, origins, energetics, mating systems, morphology, geographical distributions, and population-level phenomena. Lecture and Laboratory.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 215 or consent 

Clinically important parasites. Protozoans, Flukes, Tapeworms, Roundworms, Ticks, Mites and Insects. Designed for Medical Technology, Pre-Med, Pre-Vet and Biology majors. Identification, clinical disease, epidemiology and ecology are covered. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 100 or BIOL 105, BIOL 106 recommended 

Morphological, physiological, medical, and economic significance of insects.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105 and BIOL 106 or consent 

An exploration of behavioral strategy, communication, learning, and social systems of animals, with emphases placed on the causes, evolution, ecological implications, and function of behavior at the individual and population level. Lab included.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 215 

Expands upon general principles of ecology to focus on the factors that regulate the distribution and abundance of plants, analysis of plant populations, and dynamics of plant communities. Lecture and lab (fieldwork) included. (Taking BIOL 217 is strongly recommended before taking this class.)

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, BIOL 215 or consent. BIOL 217 strongly recommended. 

This course will introduce students to the principles and practices of weed science. Lecture will cover topics including weed biology and ecology, an introduction to weed management techniques and methodologies, factors affecting weed control, and environmental issues associated with weed management. Course material will highlight weed management in cropping systems, non-row crop and right-of-ways, natural areas, and aquatic habitats. The laboratory component of the course will focus on weed identification, crop/weed competition, application techniques including effective herbicide use and current weed control practices.In addition to the the prerequisites listed, BIOL 217 is strongly recommended.

Prerequisites: none

Lecture/laboratory course that presents an integrated view of plant biology, crop science, ecology, sustainability and current issues in biotechnology. Course focuses on issues of global concern such as sustainable food production, cropping techniques, climate change responses, pest management and herbicides, resistance, biofuels, genetically modified crops, molecular pharming, and tissue culture. Fall.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106

The course will be an introduction to the analysis of spatial data using the concept of a geographic information system (GIS). Content of the course will be, to a great extent, based on the NCGIA core curriculum with assignments tailored to the data and software available within the department such as ArcGIS.

Prerequisites: none

This course examines the dynamic nature of soils including the processes that control formation and degradation, anthropogenic impacts, spatial distribution across landscapes, and links among soils and other components of the earth system. A combination of lectures and hands-on exercises in field and laboratory settings are utilized to explore the complex interactions between soils and landscapes.

Prerequisites: none

This course examines basic concepts and components of soils, factors that influence formation and degradation, soil as a natural resource for ecosystems and societies, and the importance of soil conservation to restore functions that reduce erosion, improve water quality and quantity, mitigate climate change, enhance biodiversity, and increase agricultural productivity to feed an expanding population. Students will gain hands-on experience in field and laboratory settings to assess soil quality and quantity, investigate site-specific and landscape-scale impacts to soils, and develop management strategies to protect and improve soils in urban and agricultural systems.

Prerequisites: none

This course covers the basic strategies for field mapping using data acquired from global positioning systems (GPS).

Prerequisites: GEOG 373 or equivalent 

The application of geologic data and principles to problems created by human occupancy and use of the physical environment. Lecture and laboratory topics include soil classification and conservation, hazardous waste site evaluation and remediation, and living with geologic hazards.

Prerequisites: GEOL 121 

4-Year Plan

First Year

Fall - 16 Credits

This course develops concepts and skills in algebra and introductory calculus needed to model applications in business, economics, social sciences and life sciences, using polynomials, exponentials, logarithms, linear systems, linear programming, sequences, series, derivatives and integrals.

Prerequisites: Satisfy Placement Table in this section, or grade of “C” (2.0) or better in either MATH 112 or MATH 115.

Goal Areas: GE-04

General Education Course * 3 credits

General Education Course * 3 credits

General Education Course * 3 credits

Spring - 14 Credits

The accounting process, financial statement preparation, and analysis. Includes the accounting cycle, asset, liability, and equity accounting. Emphasis on the use of accounting data.

Prerequisites: MATH 112 or MATH 115or MATH 121 or MATH 130 or MATH 181

Emphasis on forces influencing employment and inflation. Current problems of the economy are stressed along with tools government has to cope with them.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-05

This course is required for admission to the College of Business for all business majors. The purpose of the course is to provide students with an overview of COB majors, allow students to create an academic plan for graduation, and develop professional skills needed for future job placement. Topics include cover letter and resume writing, interviewing skills, the process of networking, the internship program, etiquette skills, and requirements for graduation.

Prerequisites: none

General Education Course * 3 credits

General Education Course * 3 credits

Second Year

Fall - 15 Credits

This course provides a basic understanding of marketing concepts with emphasis on the pricing, promotion, and distribution of need satisfying products and services in domestic and international markets. The format of the course consists of lectures, case discussions, application exercises, projects, exams, and in-class group assignments.

Prerequisites: none

This course examines basic management concepts and principles, their historical development, and their application to modern organizations. Topics covered include planning, organizing, decision making, leadership, control, and organizational change. In addition, the course includes an introduction to business ethics and social responsibility, human resource management, organizational design and organizational behavior.

Prerequisites: none

An introduction to finance relating to problems, methods, and policies in financing business enterprise.

Prerequisites: ACCT 200

BUS 397 provides students an entrepreneurial real-world learning opportunity. Students gain additional insight into business concepts by applying the material in a real-world environment and gaining insight into the integrated nature of business. The class focuses on learning to develop and operate a business entity. Student teams will operate their own company, obtain an actual bank loan, and sell their chosen products throughout the semester. The class provides an opportunity to practice business skills such as communication, problem-solving, and leadership. Students learn what it takes for entrepreneurs to succeed while giving back through community service.

Prerequisites: Must be admitted to a major.

General Education Course * 3 credits

Spring - 15 Credits

Examines decision making by the individual firm, the determination of prices and wages, and current problems facing business firms.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-05

Basic statistical methods including measures of central tendency and dispersion, probability, probability distributions, sampling, problems of estimation and hypothesis testing in the case of one and two sample meaans and proportions. Chi-Square, one-way analysis of variance, simple regression and correlation analysis, and brief introduction to multiple regression analysis. Use of computer statistical packages required.

Prerequisites: MATH 112 or equivalent

Goal Areas: GE-02, GE-04

Preparation and analysis of cost-based management reports: use of cost information to make short-term operating decisions and long-term capital decisions.

Prerequisites: ACCT 200

International dimensions of business: global business environment (economic, cultural, legal, political) and international business functions (management, marketing, finance, exporting, importing).

Prerequisites: none

Other Graduation Requirements Course * 2 credits

Third Year

Fall - 15 Credits

Application of law to business settings; the American court system; alternative dispute resolution; ethics and the social responsibility of business; fundamentals of legal reasoning; sources of law; constitutional, criminal, tort, and contract law; business associations.

Prerequisites: none

This course is designed to introduce students to the Management Information Systems and its application in organizations. The course will present to the students the information systems role to support the various managerial activities, and to help the students identify and evaluate various options in Management Information Systems.

Prerequisites: ISYS 101 or CIS 101

This course examines supply chain concepts and principles, theoretical concepts and their application to modern and future agriculture industries. This course will have an emphasis on regional agriculture and food commodities as well as processed food production and manufacturing. Professionals in the agriculture industry will be brought into class to explain how agribusiness supply chain knowledge and skills are essential to various sectors. Students will have an opportunity to broaden their thinking, understanding, and professional potential as related to the agribusiness and food industry while interacting with professionals and facility tours.

Prerequisites: none

This course examines basic business concepts and principles and their application to modern and future agriculture industries. Agribusiness topics covered include commodities, supply chain, finance, sales, accounting, law, engineering, food safety, healthcare, data analysis, and technology. Professionals in the agriculture industry will be brought into class to explain how business knowledge and skills are essential to various sectors; including but not limited to: livestock, poultry, corn/soybeans, bio-fuels, engineering, and natural resources. Students will have an opportunity to broaden their thinking, understanding, and professional potential as related to the agriculture industry while interacting with industry professionals.

Prerequisites: none

Required General Education Course * 3 credits

Spring - 15 Credits

This course engages students in the study of the operations management function in manufacturing and service organizations. Students learn how to apply the basic analytical models to operation decisions involving topics such as scheduling, production technology, inventory management, quality assurance, just-in-time production, and others.

Prerequisites: ECON 207 

The goal of this course is to provide a basic understanding of finance for students entering agribusiness profession. The primary objective of this course is to cover all basic topics, including time value of money, agricultural lending, financial statement analysis following Generally Accepted Accounting Principles (GAAP), the Farm Credit System, risk in agribusiness, legal matter in agribusiness, national and international trend in agribusiness finance.

Prerequisites: none

Course in Emphasis * 3 credits

Elective Course in Major * 3 credits

General Education Course * 3 credits

Fourth Year

Fall - 15 Credits

MGMT 481 is an integrative course for COB majors. Its emphasis is on understanding the role of a general manager, which should include an operations and international component.

Prerequisites: FINA 362, MRKT 210, MGMT 230, MGMT 346

Elective Course in Major * 3 credits

Other Graduation Requirements Course * 3 credits

General Education Course * 3 credits

Elective Course in Major * 3 credits

Spring - 15 Credits

Supervised experience in agribusiness or food related organizations, industry, state, or federal institutions.

Prerequisites: none

Course in Emphasis * 3 credits

General Education Course * 3 credits

Other Graduation Requirements Course * 3 credits

Other Graduation Requirements Course * 3 credits