Biology (BS)

Nuclear Medicine Technology

Nuclear Medicine Technology is a highly specialized allied healthcare field that utilizes radioactive materials in diagnosis, treatment of disease, and medical research. The nuclear medicine technologist prepares and administers radioactive chemical compounds called radiopharmaceuticals. Through the use of specialized cameras and radiation detecting instrumentation, the nuclear medicine technologist acquires and analyzes detailed images which aid the physician in diagnosing molecular, metabolic, physiological, anatomical, and pathological conditions. Nuclear medicine scanners may also be combined with computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to enhance the diagnostic capabilities of an imaging procedure. The four year Nuclear Medicine Technology Program curriculum consists of three years spent at the university completing required courses and electives. The fourth year is a 34 credit internship spent in professional education and experience. Agencies participating in the nuclear medicine technology program include, but are not limited to Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences in Rochester, MN. Admission into the fourth year accredited program at Mayo Clinic School of Health Sciences is competitive. Therefore, admission to the program does not ensure placement into the fourth year internship. The BS degree is awarded by the university after successful completion of the internship year. Graduates will be eligible to take the professional certification examinations administered by the Nuclear Medicine Technology Certification Board and /or the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists. Nuclear medicine technologists are employed in a wide variety of clinical settings including large and small community hospitals, university affiliated teaching hospitals and medical centers, outpatient and research imaging facilities, as well as private institutes. Adjunct faculty at the clinical site include: Matthew Ugorowski, M.Ed.,CNMT,PET; Michelle Bartel, CNMT; Mike Dick, CNMT; Heather Dewhirst, CNMT; and Holly Hintermeister, CNMT. Students accepted into the clinical internship will be responsible for: Proof of Medical / Hospitalization / Health Insurance; Health / Physical Exam; Tuberculosis (TB) testing; and Proof of Immunization which may include the following: Hepatitis B, Measles, Mumps, Rubella, Tetanus, Chickenpox (Varicella), and Influenza. Additionally, students will need to provide proof of CPR certification and may also be required to submit to Drug Screen Testing. Internship sites are required by law to do Background Checks on all students admitted to their nuclear medicine technology programs.

Program Requirements

Required General Education

Study of biological processes at the suborganismal level including cell chemistry, metabolism, reproduction, genetics, and complex tissue physiology. Laboratory and discussion sessions stress problem solving and experimental design.

Prerequisites: none

Goal Areas: GE-03

Introduction to the basic principles of chemistry including atomic and molecular structure, bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, thermodynamics and states of matter. Laboratory will reinforce lecture concepts. Prereq: C or higher in MATH 112 or the equivalent; high school chemistry or C or higher in CHEM 104

Prerequisites: “C” (2.0) or higher in MATH 112 or the equivalent; high school chemistry or “C” (2.0) or higher in CHEM 104.

Goal Areas: GE-02, GE-03

Introduction to learning the written and oral communication of technical information. Assignments include writing and presenting proposals, reports, and documentation. Emphasis on use of rhetorical analysis, computer applications, collaborative writing, and usability testing to complete technical communication tasks in the workplace.

Prerequisites: ENG 101 

Goal Areas: GE-02, GE-13

Limits, continuity, the derivative and applications, transcendental functions, L'Hopital's Rule, and development of the Riemann integral.

Prerequisites: Satisfy Placement Table in this section, MATH 115 or both MATH 112 and MATH 113 with “C” (2.0) or better.

Goal Areas: GE-04

General background in physical concepts for those who do not plan advanced study in physics or engineering. Topics include mechanics, fluids, heat and thermodynamics. Lecture and laboratory.

Prerequisites: Either MATH 112 and MATH 113, or MATH 115

Goal Areas: GE-02, GE-03

Major Common Core

Study of biological processes at the organismal level including a survey of life forms (viruses, bacteria, protists, fungi, plants, and animals), their evolution, and ecology. Laboratory and discussion sessions stress problem solving and experimental design.

Prerequisites: BIOL 105 

Introduction to genetic analysis. Topics covered will include those of both classical and modern genetics: population genetics, molecular genetics, genetic manipulation of organisms and selection. Central to this course will be the primacy of the trait as the object of genetics and the development/refinement of the concept of the gene. Lab included.Fall, Spring, Summer

Prerequisites: BIOL 105, BIOL 106, and MATH 112 

Emphasis Common Core

Systems approach to the structure of the human body. The course is designed for students majoring in biology or health related programs. Lab included.

Prerequisites: none

Principles of functions of human cells, organs, and systems with an emphasis on organ/system interactions. This course is designed for students majoring in biology, chemistry, or related sciences, and medically-related areas. Includes a laboratory with a research and medical emphasis.

Prerequisites: BIOL 220, CHEM 104 or CHEM 106 or CHEM 111 or CHEM 201

The clinical internship and training include lectures, demonstrations, laboratory sessions, and clinical practicum in the area of nuclear medicine technology in affiliation with Mayo School of Health Sciences in Rochester, MN.

Prerequisites: none

The clinical internship and training include lectures, demonstrations, laboratory sessions, and clinical practicum in the area of nuclear medicine technology in affiliation with Mayo School of Health Sciences in Rochester, MN.

Prerequisites: none

Continuation of the basic principles of chemistry including properties of solutions, kinetics, acids and bases, equilibria, buffers, precipitation reactions, electron transfer reactions, electrochemistry, entropy and free energy. Laboratory will reinforce lecture concepts.

Prerequisites: “C” (2.0) or higher in CHEM 201 

Introduction to organic nomenclature, structure, bonding, chemical reactivity, organic acid-base reactions, mechanisms and stereochemistry. IR, MS, and NMR spectroscopy will be introduced. The chemistry of alkanes, alkyl halides, alkenes, alkynes, and alcohols will be covered. Laboratory illustrates synthetic techniques and the preparation and reactions of functional groups discussed during lecture.

Prerequisites: CHEM 202, “C” (2.0) or higher in CHEM 202.

Analysis of the structure and metabolism of biologically important compounds. This intermediate-level course is designed for students in the medical technology, food science, chemistry education, chemistry and pre-professional health majors. The laboratory teaches basic biochemical techniques.

Prerequisites: Either CHEM 322 and CHEM 324 or CHEM 322 and CHEM 323. “C” (2.0) or higher in all prerequisites 

For health care personnel, emphasis on spelling, pronunciation and meaning.

Prerequisites: none

Includes waves and sound, electricity and magnetism, light and optics, and topics in modern physics. Lecture and laboratory.

Prerequisites: PHYS 211 

This course bridges the gap between introductory physics and its application to the life and biomedical sciences. Topics include fluid flow, membrane transport, nerve conduction, imaging methods including MRI, CT, and nuclear imaging, radiotherapy, and health physics.

Prerequisites: MATH 121, PHYS 212 or PHYS 222 

Emphasis Restricted Electives

Statistics Requirement - Choose 3 - 4 Credit(s).

Introduction to statistical analysis as applied to the health sciences. Examines concepts and methods of statistical procedures applied to health problems and issues.

Prerequisites: MATH 110, STAT 154, Or any other mathematics course higher than MATH 110.

An introduction to statistical concepts and methods that is applicable to all disciplines. Topics include descriptive measures of data, probability and probability distributions, statistical inference, tests of hypotheses, confidence intervals, correlation, linear regression, and analysis of variance. The use of statistical software will be emphasized. Prereq: ACT Math sub-score of 19 or higher, successful completion of MATH 098 or appropriate placement scores (see Placement Information under Statistics) Fall, Spring, Summer GE-4

Prerequisites: Satisfy Placement Table in this section, or MATH 098 with grade of P. 

Goal Areas: GE-02, GE-04